Kimberly Raye: Slippery When Wet

Jaycee Anderson and her sister Riley Vaughn have recently inherited a NASCAR racing team from their father. Jaycee is the only female driver, and she and Riley desperately need sponsors to keep their business afloat. However, their only sponsor is an energy drink producer who insists that the tomboyish Jaycee gets a makeover to make her more feminine and thus more interesting for the female fans. Jaycee also has to deal with Rory Canyon, her incredibly attractive racing competitor...

What in the world gave me the idea to read this book? I don't remember. But it was a really, really bad idea. The book is, in one word, awful. Everything about it is totally wrong. Also, totally unlikely. I like my romance novels with just a hint of similarity to something that could happen in the real world, but this book doesn't deliver. First of all, the storyline about the sponsor wanting Jaycee to get a makeover is absolutely stupid. I certainly don't know much about car racing but there's one thing I'm so sure about that I would bet my next salary on it: its female fans are not the kind of ladies who want their role models to meditate, eat sprout sandwiches rather than burgers, and dress like distinguished ladies. I'm also quite sure that neither female car racing fans nor anyone else want their idols to have Michael Bolton music on their website. (In fact, I think nobody at all should scare off their website's visitors with this kind of music, but that's another topic). And then, of course, there's Rory, the so-called hero of the book and Jaycee's love interest. There's nothing likable about him. He's not particularly bright, and he has a singularly stupid reason for not wanting to fall in love with Jaycee, thus creating the "conflict" of the plot: you see, his Daddy has founded a sort of club for men named "The Himanists". (As opposed to "humanists". Funny. Haha.) Anyway, this club is kind of like Al Bundy's NO MA'AM club. They want men to be manly and women to be barefoot and pregnant rather than self-confident and educated or professional. Now, Jaycee isn't terribly self-confident or feminist, but being a race car driver apparently puts her on Rory's Dad's black list, and therefore, he thinks that good old Daddy will disinherit him if she's his girlfriend. That's all. That's the plot. It's completely daft and I really don't know why I even bothered to read this book till the end. This is an "inadequate" book (Grade E)